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Tuesday, April 21, 2020 | History

5 edition of Civil War prisons & escapes found in the catalog.

Civil War prisons & escapes

Robert E. Denney

Civil War prisons & escapes

a day-by-day chronicle

by Robert E. Denney

  • 126 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Sterling Pub. Co. in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States,
  • Confederate States of America
    • Subjects:
    • Prisoners of war -- United States -- History -- 19th century.,
    • Prisoners of war -- Confederate States of America -- History.,
    • United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Prisoners and prisons.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibiographical references (p. 383-384) and index.

      Other titlesCivil War prisons and escapes.
      StatementRobert E. Denney ; foreword by Edwin C. Bearss.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE615 .D46 1993
      The Physical Object
      Pagination399 p. :
      Number of Pages399
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1414499M
      ISBN 100806904143
      LC Control Number93023889

      Famous Adventures And Prison Escapes Of The Civil War William Pittenger, soldier during the American Civil War and a recipient of the Medal of Honor () This ebook presents «Famous Adventures And Prison Escapes Of The Civil War», from William Pittenger. A dynamic table of contents enables to jump directly to the chapter selected.


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Civil War prisons & escapes by Robert E. Denney Download PDF EPUB FB2

Famous Adventures and Prison Escapes of the Civil War - Kindle edition Civil War prisons & escapes book Various Artists. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Famous Adventures and Prison Escapes of the Civil War/5(11).

Early in the Civil War, prisons were adequate to hold the numbers of prisoners. As the war continued and the number of prisoners increased, so did the number of facilities. Some locations were utilized to hold soldiers captured on the battlefield as well as political prisoners suspected of disloyalty.5/5(1).

American Revolutionary War. - Continental Navy officer Joshua Barney escaped from Hill Prison in England. American Civil War. November - Confederate General John Hunt Morgan and six of his officers escaped from the Ohio Penitentiary. February 9 - Libby Prison escape. American Civil War Prison Camps were operated by both the Union and the Confederacy to handle thesoldiers captured during the war from to The Record and Pension Office in countedNortherners who were captured.

In Civil War prisons & escapes book were immediately paroled; after the parole exchange system broke down inaboutwent to prison camps. The most famous Civil War prison is possibly Andersonville in Georgia, but there were other notorious prisons: Camp Douglas in Chicago, Old Capitol Prison in Civil War prisons & escapes book, D.C., and Libby Prison in Civil War prisons & escapes book.

This is only a short list of Civil War prisons. Casstevens discusses these and many others. Brooks D. Simpson Arizona State University Civil War Prisons and Escapes: A Day-by-Day Chronicle.

By Robert E. Denney. (New York: Sterling Publishing Co., Pp. $) This book's title quite accurately describes its content. Writing for a popular audience, its author tells in chronicle format the story of the Civil War's prisons.

A collection of essays by various writers on American Civil War prisons in both the North and South. Based on diaries and records, the authors describe life in these camps. This is a side of the Civil War often ignored.

The major drawback is the smaller sized font used in printing but the book should be in any Civil War collection/5. Get this from a library.

Civil War prisons & escapes: a day-by-day chronicle. [Robert E Denney] -- Chronicles life in the prisons of both sides during the Civil War, included are. Civil War prisons & escapes book Many Civil War prisoners, Confederate and Federal, came to feel that a quick death from a bullet would have been better than slowly starving in a cold, crowded, filthy prison.

The hope of freedom was sometimes the only thing that kept a prisoner alive and he tried every way possible to :   Disunion follows the Civil War as it unfolded. Thomas Rose could see the Union troops approaching from the east.

After five days of torturous travel on foot, he was about to make good his escape from Richmond’s infamous Libby Prison. By earlyeven Confederate officials realized that conditions were ripe for a prisoner revolt, and they began planning to transfer Libby’s inmates to Civil War prisons & escapes book prisons further south.

Before the exodus began, however, one of the most famous prison escapes of the Civil War occurred at Libby Prison. Portals to Hell: Military Prisons of the Civil War, by Lonnie R.

Speer, Stackpole Books, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, ()pages, $ Portals to Hell is Civil War prisons & escapes book Historynet Staff. First published in as a special edition of Civil War History journal, Civil War Prisons remains the standard on the topic.

Editor Hesseltine tackles the historiography of northern and southern prisons during the American Civil War. He attempts to bring closure to the legendary northern myth that the Southern government did its best to "exterminate" Union prisoners by calling the effective Reviews: 1.

Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Early in the Civil War, prisons were adequate to hold the numbers of prisoners. As the war continued and the number of prisoners increased, so did the number of facilities. name\/a> \" \"Out of the mouth of hell\": Civil War prisons and escapes\/span>\"@ en\/a> ; \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n.

Prisons and Prisoners of War: An Overview The history of the American Civil War is rife with examples of hardship and pain, but perhaps nowhere were conditions harsher than in the prisoner-of-war camps that dotted the interiors of both the North and South during the final two years of the conflict.

Civil War Prisons edited by William B. Hesseltine published by The Kent State University Press () pages $ Paperback, $ Kindle.

This collection of short essays, originally published in the journal Civil War History at the start of the Civil War Centennial, was the standard scholarly work on the subject for more than a quarter. Civil War prison camps were notoriously filthy and disease-ridden camps, warehouses, forts and prisons that held an estimatedcaptured Civil War soldiers, as well as spies and political prisoners, during the war.

Some of these prisoners included members of John Wilkes Booth’s family, who were held at the Old Capital Prison in Washington D.C. following Abraham Lincoln‘s. Buy a cheap copy of Civil War Prisons book by William Best Hesseltine. For all the serious scholarship and popular writing devoted to the American Civil War, the topic of prisoner-of-war camps, more than any other, retains the feeling Free shipping over $Cited by: Books: James M.

Gillispie, Andersonvilles of the North: The Myths and Realities of Northern Treatment of Civil War Confederate Prisoners. Denton, TX: University of North Texas Press, Michael P. Gray, The Business of Captivity: Elmira and its Civil War Prison. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, William Best Hesseltine, Civil War Prisons: A Study in War Psychology.

His first book, The Business of Captivity: Elmira and its Civil War Prison (Kent State University Press, ), was a finalist for the Seaborg Award, and a chapter of that work, first published in Civil War History, earned “Honorable Mention” for the Eastern National Award.

The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System currently includes information about two Civil War prisons: Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland, once a temporary home to more t Confederate soldiers; and Andersonville prison camp in Andersonville, Georgia.

Part 9: As the years went by, Civil War prison experiences became the fodder for adventure yarns. One volume, Famous Adventures and Prison Escapes of the Civil War, went through a number of s were also seen as likely tourism sites, with Libby Prison being dismantled and moved to Richmond to be opened to paying customers.

At first the Confederacy’s prisoners came in a trickle. The first public mention of them came in June Newspapers in Richmond, Virginia reported that captives were reaching the capital from Manassas Junction, Newport News, and other places where the two. The information I have provided came from a book entitled, "Civil War Prisons & Escapes" by Robert E.

Denney. This book was published in I hope this information will be somewhat helpful. I have a great-granduncle who was at Elmira Prison Camp in New York during the Civil War.

Conditions there were terrible, too. I have a great-granduncle. FAMOUS ADVENTURERS AND PRISON ESCAPES OF THE CIVIL WAR, Cable, Edition, Hardcover, pages.

Great etching illustrations. BOOK NATIONAL PARK CIVIL WAR SERIES, THE PRISON CAMP AT ANDERSONVILLE ANDERSONVILLE CONFEDERATE PRISON, BOOK (ANDERSONVILLE, GEORGIA. $ Free shipping. CIVIL WAR PRISONS AND Seller Rating: % positive. Editorial Reviews. Kirkus Reviews “The harrowing, little-known story of the Union officers who escaped from a Richmond prison in —an episode that deserves a higher place in Civil War lore.A true-adventure story that also documents how prisoner abuse and recriminations spurred the federal commitment to the “total war” that ravaged the South”Author: Joseph Wheelan.

Famous Adventures and Prison Escapes of the Civil War Orlando B. Willcox, Basil Wilson Duke, A. Richards, William Pittenger, Frank E.

Moran, John Taylor Wood, Thomas Henry Hines, W. Shelton Limited preview -   A nice addition to the Marvel Cinematic Universe from the comics that made its debut in Captain America: Civil War is the “Raft”.

A prison located in the waters of New York City, the Raft is Author: Evan Valentine. A Tour Guide to the Civil War, Fourth Edition: The Complete State-by-State Guide to Battlegrounds, Landmarks, Museums, Relics, and Sites.

Nashville, Tennessee, U.S.A. Thomas Nelson, Paperback. Lightly thumbed, small crease to rear cover, else tight and clean.

More. Civil War Prisons- A Digital History Collection. In response to requests from visitors to this site, we have compiled the most thorough collection of Civil War Prison resources in the public domain you will find anywhere.

The collection details below say it all. Andersonville was notorious Civil War-era Confederate military prison in Andersonville, Georgia. The prison, officially called Camp Sumter, was the South’s largest prison for captured Union.

Like a River is the story of two teenagers, Leander and Paul, who join the Union Army during the Civil War. However, neither of the two really experience much fighting, and instead the novel is more of a depiction of a hospital and a prisoner-of-war camp than an account of Civil War battles.4/5.

The only remaining evidence that there was a prison that held Confederate soldiers during the Civil War is the Confederate Cemetery where approximately prisoners are buried. Additionally, the Rock Island National Cemetery is also located on the island, where the remains of at least Union guards are interred, as well as o The Civil War Prisoner Camp That Became a Place of Horror The Confederate Civil War prisoner camp in Andersonville, Georgia, was an utter nightmare for the many soldiers held within.

The prison was constructed as a fort to protect northern cities. A foot-deep, foot moat surrounded the prison. The granite walls were seven to thirty feet thick. The prison was plagued with the usual diseases and malnutrition of all prisons north and south during the Civil War.

At this prison 2, Confederate prisoners died. War prisons are frequently described as “hellholes,” and that damning epithet has been applied to Fort Delaware’s Civil War prison for captured Confederates.

was home to a number of Confederate prisons during the Civil War (). Though dwarfed by the shadow of notorious Andersonville Prison, there were fifteen other facilities in the ranged from well-constructed fortifications, such as county jails, to makeshift installations, such as wooded areas patrolled by armed guards surrounding prisoners.

Pickenpaugh plans to add a companion to his book with an investigation of southern prisons, but one might wonder if it will, when complete, be a significant contribution to the field of Civil War prisons; if it follows the same pattern of Captives in Gray, it will be perhaps more comparable to Lonnie Speer's single-volume narrative history.

Civil War prison camps were terrible places, when they saw the photographs of emaciated Andersonville prisoners who literally looked like skeletons, northerners were shocked and horrified.

Many claimed the conditions at Andersonville were a cruel conspiracy against northern soldiers, deliberately perpetuated by Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee and other Confederate leaders. A published transcription list of Missouri-only Confederate prisoners was done by Joanne Chiles Eakin and is available from Civil War Lady’s Book Shoppe.

The Women and Children’s Prisoner List on this website is the most thorough and complete listing to date of women and children held prisoner in the St. Louis prisons during the Civil War. Civil War Prisons. In the very beginning of pdf Civil War, prisoners of war were pdf right on the battlefield, a private for a private, a sergeant for a sergeant and a captain for a captain.

In this system broke down and caused the creation of large holding pens for prisoners in .The conditions that captured Union soldiers endured at the Confederacy’s Andersonville Prison were horrific. During the 18 months that the prison was in operation, nea Union soldiers died from malnutrition, disease, and exposure to the elements due to inhumane treatment by Andersonville’s Commander Henry Wirz.Civil War Prisons Over-crowded and ill ventilated prisons were apparently ebook in Civil War Missouri.

A report published in the Missouri Democrat of Septem after an inspection of the Gratiot Street military prison by U.S. Army Medical Examiner, Surgeon J.B. Colegrove, included many criticisms.